Obtaining your Provisional License.

    In order to be able to have driving lessons you must be 17 years of age and hold a UK Provisional Driving license. You can however apply for a license up to 3 months before your 17th birthday.

    You will need a D1 Form from the Post Office together with Passport or Birth Certificate and a Passport sized photograph. This form should sent to the DVLA (or DVLI in Northern Ireland). You can also apply online:

How long before I can start having lessons with Mikes-Driving School?

    Unfortunately, I cannot always guarantee to  that you will be able to commence driving lessons immediately, this is due my current commitments with existing pupils. This waiting time can vary throughout the year and will be dependent on when during the day you will be looking to have lessons.

    To assist you in planning your lessons start date, I have included this waiting time here and it is repeated  on the main page of my web site. It is advisable to book lessons as early as possible to be sure to obtain the earliest start date currently available that meets your requirements, so please don’t hesitate to contact me.

    The current waiting time for starting  lessons is  shown on at the top right banner of this website

How do I teach?

    Ideally, I would recommend that each lesson should be 2 hours long wherever possible, taken regularly over a period of time, in order to get the maximum benefit for your time and money from the structured teaching of DSA Prescribed modules using the Recap, Practice and Review phases.

    See the information below to see why a 2 hour lesson could potentially save you time and money.

    However, 2 hours is sometimes not suitable for all sorts of reasons, in which case we will can look at 1.5 hr or 1 hr lessons.

    All lessons are provided on a 1:1 basis, ensuring that you get the maximum benefit from your time booked.

    I provide a pick up/drop off service to/from your home, school, college or workplace.

    For more information on how basic lessons are structured and how your progress can be assessed and monitored please have a look the DSA Web site.

How much training will you need?

    The amount of training people need to reach the level necessary to pass their test varies greatly from person to person. As a guideline the DSA has researched those candidates who have successfully passed the test and have noted that:

    “Those who pass their driving test have had, on average, about 45 hours of professional training combined with 22 hours of private practice. Learners who prepare this way, with a combination of plenty of professional training and plenty of practice, do better in the test.”

So how long could it take to learn to Drive?

The  following chart is a guide only, there is no implication that any individual should achieve the quoted figures. Some people need more hours than others.

 

 

LEARNING

RATE

 

 

1. AGE

2. Outstanding

3. Fast

4. Average

5. Below Average

6. Slow

17-19

26-29

30-34

35-40*

41-50

51-76

20

27-30

31-36

37-42

43-52

53-78

22

28-32

33-38

39-45

46-56

57-80

24

29-34

35-41

42-48

49-60

61-81

26

30-35

36-43

45-50

51-64

65-84

28

31-37

38-45

46-54

55-66

67-87

30

32-39

40-49

50-56

57-69

70-92

32

33-40

41-51

52-58

59-72

73-94

34

34-42

43-53

54-62

63-75

76-96

36

35-43

44-55

56-65

66-78

79-100

38

36-45

46-57

58-68

69-84

85-103

40

37-47

48-59

60-70

71-88

89-106

42

38-50

51-63

64-74

75-92

93-113

44

39-52

53-65

66-78

79-95

96-117

46

40-54

55-69

70-82

83-100

101-119

48

41-55

56-71

72-86

86-106

107-126

50

42-57

58-75

76-90

91-101

112-132

52

43-58

59-79

78-93

94-114

115-135

54

44-59

60-79

80-95

96-116

117-137

56

45-60

61-81

82-97

98-118

119-139

58

46-62

63-83

84-102

103-123

124-144

60

47-68

69-87

88-108

109-129

130+

  • *For an Average 17 year old DSA Research shows that about 40 hours of professional training plus additional practice provides the best chance of passing.
  • All figures assume the pupil has no previous experience.
  • All figures assumes a reasonable continuity of lessons (at least a 2 hour session per week) and no private practice.

How can a 2 hour lesson save me time and money?

A typical driving lesson will be structured to meet your individual needs. It will recap on topics perviously covered, permit discussion of new topics and allow practice time to develop new driving skills. It will conclude with a debrief, evaluation of the progress you have made and also look forward to you next lesson.

(In the following, which uses example lessons to demonstrate the advantages of 2 hour lessons, the times used are approximate and will in practice vary from lesson to lesson.)

A typical 1 hr lesson would break down as follows:

  • Recap and Discussion if necessary about previous lesson (10 mins)
  • Instruction and Discussion of new topic (10 mins)
  • Practice of New Topic (30 mins)
  • Debrief, evaluation and looking forward to next lesson (10 mins)

However a typical 2 hr lesson would breakdown as follows:

  • Recap and Discussion if necessary about previous lesson (10 mins)
  • Instruction and Discussion of new topic (10 mins)
  • Practice of New Topic (90 mins)
  • Debrief, evaluation and looking forward to next lesson (10 mins)

Therefore:

    • Two, 1 hr lessons will only permit 60 mins actual “driving time”, whereas
    • A single 2 hr lesson will permit 90 mins actual “driving time”.

So with regular training and by taking 2 hour lessons, it is possible to reduce the number of hours required overall.

Role and Responsibilities of the Supervising Driver

The Supervising Driver is simply the ‘official’ name given to the person who will be taking you out for private practice sessions in a car other than that used for your normal driving lessons.  There are number of legal requirements that both the Supervising Driver and the car you will be using must meet, they are:-

  • The Supervising Driver must be over 21 and have held a full license for the category of vehicle for at least 3 years.
  • The car must have insurance cover for the learner driver.
  • The car must display L plates (to the correct legal standard) to the front and rear and should not restrict the drivers vision through the windows.

It is the responsibility of your Supervising Driver to make sure that you act responsibly and behave in a manner that is safe while you are driving. They will be considered to be in control of the vehicle when a learner driver is at the wheel, so for example, if they have been drinking or using a mobile phone when an accident occurs the punishment will be applied to them just as if they were driving the car.

So in order that these sessions are safe, legal and beneficial, follow some of these simple guidelines:

  • You or your learner must not use a mobile phone whilst driving.
  • The Supervising Driver and the learner must not exceed the drink drive limits. So you can't use them to drive you home from the pub!
  • Fit an additional suction mirror so you can see what is going on behind you. Available at good car accessory shops for a few pounds. 
  • Sit in the front seat and be ready to steer the car.
  • Don't put yourself or your learner in a dangerous situation, plan out your route.
  • Each lesson with an ADI is designed to develop independence in an area of the pupils driving. Private practice should reflect the level of the pupils ability so that they can "practice".  So it is always a good idea to have a chat with you instructor so that these sessions can support your lessons.
  • The Supervising Driver may need to drive the learner to the location , allow the practice then drive home again. I am happy to give guidance on what to practice and where to practice it.
  • Modern cars should be driven differently to those of 20 years ago. As vehicles have evolved, the methods used to drive them have also evolved. (For example block gear changing up and down the gear box should be encouraged, where in the past this was not )
  • Driving should be smooth and unhurried. You should be aiming towards a "limo ride" rather than a late night Friday taxi ride.
  • These methods should reduce wear and tear and help improve fuel economy. The current DSA test reflects these methods